Whatterz


Big City, Little People

by Simon. Average Reading Time: less than a minute.

They’re Not Pets, Susan, says a stern father who has just shot a bumblebee, its wings sparkling in the evening sunlight; a lone office worker, less than an inch high, looks out over the river in his lunch break, Dreaming of Packing it all In; and a tiny couple share a Last Kiss against the soft neon lights of the city at midnight. Mixing sharp humour with a delicious edge of melancholy, Little People in the City brings together the collected photographs of Slinkachu, a street-artist who for several years has been leaving little hand-painted people in the bustling city to fend for themselves, waiting to be discovered.

Oddly enough, even when you know they are just hand-painted figurines, you can’t help but feel that their plights convey something of our own fears about being lost and vulnerable in a big, bad city.

The Times.

(Click on the images to see a larger view)

 

Slinkachu has a website and a blog.

The book titled Little People in the City: The Street Art of Slinkachu with many more great miniture scenes can be bought from Amazon.

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