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IDEO's Human Centered Design Toolkit

by Simon. Average Reading Time: about a minute.

IDEO’s Human Centered Design Toolkit is a free innovation guide for NGOs and social enterprises.

Human-Centered Design (HCD) is a process used for decades to create new solutions for companies and organisations. HCD can help you enhance the lives of people. This process has been specially-adapted for organisations like that work with people in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. HCD will help you hear people’s needs in new ways, create innovative solutions to meet these needs, and deliver solutions with financial sustainability in mind.

The Toolkit is divided into four sections that can be downloaded individually or together:

  1. The Introduction will give an overview of HCD and help you understand how it might be used alongside other methods.
  2. The Hear guide will help your design team prepare for fieldwork and understand how to collect stories that will serve as insight and inspiration. Designing meaningful and innovative solutions that serve your customers begins with gaining deep empathy for their needs, hopes and aspirations for the future. The Hear booklet will equip the team with methodologies and tips for engaging people in their own contexts to delve beneath the surface.
  3. The Field Guide and Aspirations Cards are a complement to the Hear guide; these are the tools your team will take with them in order to conduct research.
  4. The Create guide will help your team work together in a workshop format to translate what you heard from people into frameworks, opportunities, solutions, and prototypes. During this phase, you will move from concrete to more abstract thinking in identifying themes and opportunities and back to the concrete with solutions and prototypes.
  5. The Deliver guide will help catapult the top ideas you have created toward implementation. The realisation of solution includes rapid revenue and cost modeling, capability assessment, and implementation panning. The activities offered in this phase are meant to complement your organisation’s existing implementation processes and may prompt adaptations to the way solutions are typically rolled out.

Download the complete toolkit (PDF, 30.5MB)

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