Whatterz


Nulla Bicycle: A New Take On Bike Design

by Simon. Average Reading Time: less than a minute.

Designer Bradford Waugh has certainly thought out of the box with his new bicycle called Nulla. Nulla, the Italian word for nothing, is a minimalist bicycle concept. Waugh named it that way for lack of central hubs or chain-drive, giving it a very minimal visual weight. Ditch that fancy car and buy a stylish bicycle, is what you will say once you have this one with you. With such a clean, simple and sleek look, this bicycle is surely going to change your mind whether to buy a car, or bike or bicycle. This futuristic bicycle provides deep coverage, good appearance and comfort perfect for riding and skating. However, it is not sure whether you will technically be able to ride this bike since the load experienced between the wheels and the frame may be too great.

What is clear, however, is that it has a futuristic appeal that would look great in conjunction with the hugely successful British Olympic Cycling Team.

(Click on the images to see a larger view)

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  • Richard Wicks

    If you weighed maybe 5 kg, and the bike was made of the most futuristic and strong composites that JUST came out of the lab, it might be POSSIBLE to ride this thing, maybe.

    I sure wish “designers” would learn something about structural engineering before coming up with “bikes” like this. My road bike weighs about 7 KG and it’s marvel of engineering, not that a “designer’ Bradford Waugh would recognize that, since evidently he doesn’t know anything apparently about actual design but he does have an eye for fashion.

    Notice you’ve never seen anybody actually on top of this “bicycle” much less seen anybody ever riding it, ever, nor will you. Put this next to Jeff Koon’s “rabbit”, because this will never see a street unless the human race constructs a dome city on Nereid or possibly, some wonder material is discovered that has the 50 times the strength in of aerospace titanium.

    Let me give Waugh a hint – spokes are under tremendous tension – this is what gives the wheel structural integrity. Make the rims 10 cm deep, and although they will be under tremendous torsional forces, it might be rideable, but it will never be safe. It would look almost identical too but everybody will notice it doesn’t have the sleek utterly unrealistic “design” of the first pie in the sky, I-know-nothing-about-material-science look. Hmm, maybe if you made the wheels out of solid steel you could make it work, but before you do, try peddling around on a Ordinary so you know how enjoyable that ride will be…

  • Thank you Mr. Wicks. Because the design is not valid right now should I not put it out there? If everyone with a half stupid idea kept it to themselves would we even have electricity? I will concede that the design has major flaws and I’m not entirely convinced that this technology is best used in the cycling world but it sure makes for an exciting application, doesn’t it?

    The point is, maybe it’ll work maybe it won’t but the real value is what it inspires others to do, how they take it further. Feel free to email me through my website if you have any further questions.