Articles tagged HTTP

An Introduction to the Semantic Web
The Semantic Web is a web of data. There is lots of data we all use every day, and most of it is not part of the web. I can see my bank statements on the web, and my photographs, and I can see my appointments in a calendar. But can I see my photos in a calendar to see what I was doing when I took them and on a map so I know where I took them? Can I see bank statement lines in a calendar? The answer, right now, is no. Read more – ‘An Introduction to the Semantic Web’.
Secure Your Application – PCI DSS Specifications
PCI DSS stands for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, and is a worldwide security standard assembled by the Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council (PCI SSC). The PCI security standards are technical and operational requirements that were created to help organizations that process card payments prevent credit card fraud, hacking and various other security vulnerabilities and threats. The standards apply to all organizations that store, process or transmit cardholder data – with guidance for software developers and manufacturers of applications and devices used in those transactions. A company processing, storing, or transmitting cardholder data must be PCI DSS compliant. Read more – ‘Secure Your Application – PCI DSS Specifications’.
Enabling Search Engine Safe URLs with Apache and htaccess
An increasingly popular technique among websites and in particular, blogs, is the idea of making URLs search engine friendly, or safe, on the premise that doing so will help search engine optimisation. By removing the obscure query string element of a URL and replacing it with keyword rich alternatives, not only makes it more readable for a human being, but also the venerable robots that allow our page content to be found in the first place. Read more – ‘Enabling Search Engine Safe URLs with Apache and htaccess’.
What's In Google Chrome's User-Agent String
With the advent Google Chrome there has been a lot of media coverage regarding the browser’s uptake and how it will compete with Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari. This is where the User Agent becomes most valuable. Read more – ‘What's In Google Chrome's User-Agent String’.
Anatomy of the Application.cfc in ColdFusion 8
With the release of ColdFusion MX 7 came the introduction of the Application.cfc ColdFusion component. This component replaced the traditional Application.cfm and OnRequestEnd.cfm ColdFusion application templates. Furthermore, if Application.cfc is present, both of these templates are ignored by the application. In addition to replacing the Application.cfm, the Application.cfc introduced a number of built in methods that handle specific events. These events, as discussed in detail below, allow for a greater control over events within the application. Read more – ‘Anatomy of the Application.cfc in ColdFusion 8’.
Configuring ColdFusion 8 with Apache
After installing ColdFusion 8 and Apache successfully you may still see an "HTTP 500 Internal Server Error" when navigating to a ColdFusion page. All is not lost, you simply need to configure, or check the configuration of Apache. Apache requires very little post installation modification, but it is always good practice to check the httpd.conf file to ensure that the ColdFusion "install" scripts did what they were supposed to do. Read more – ‘Configuring ColdFusion 8 with Apache’.
Poor Man's HTTP Compression with ColdFusion
Almost every web application will benefit from the compression of content. A compression filter optimises the size of the content that is sent from a webserver to a web browser via the Internet. Since generating content and serving pages via the World Wide Web is the core behind web applications, it is simple components that aid these processes that are incredibly useful. This is where servlet filters come into play. Read more – ‘Poor Man's HTTP Compression with ColdFusion’.