Articles tagged principles

Apple’s 27 Guidelines for Mobile User Experience Design
People appreciate mobile apps that feel as though they were designed expressly for the device. For example, when an app fits well on the device screen and responds to the gestures that people know, it provides much of the experience people are looking for. And, although people might not be aware of human interface design principles, such as direct manipulation or consistency, they can tell when apps follow them and when they don't. Read more – ‘Apple’s 27 Guidelines for Mobile User Experience Design’.
Disney’s Twelve Basic Principles of Animation
The Twelve Basic Principles of Animation is a set of principles of animation introduced by the Disney animators Ollie Johnston and Frank Thomas in their 1981 book The Illusion of Life: Disney Animation. Johnston and Thomas in turn based their book on the work of the leading Disney animators from the 1930s onwards and their effort to produce more realistic animations. The main purpose of the principles was to produce an illusion of characters adhering to the basic laws of physics, but they also dealt with more abstract issues, such as emotional timing and character appeal. Read more – ‘Disney’s Twelve Basic Principles of Animation’.
Design Principles: The Philosophy of UX
The visual principles of harmony, unity, contrast, emphasis, variety, balance, proportion, pattern and direction (and others) are widely recognised and practiced, even when they aren’t formally articulated. But creating a good design doesn’t automatically mean creating a good experience. In order for us to cultivate positive experiences for our users, we need to establish a set of guiding principles for experience design. Read more – ‘Design Principles: The Philosophy of UX’.
The Dimensions of a Good Experience
Good designs are useful, usable and desirable. But what is a good experience? While crafting the experience of her own startup, Foodspotting, Alexa Andrzejewski found answers in urban design. Asking the same question about urban experiences, Kevin Lynch, author of Good City Form, extracted a set of dimensions for evaluating experiences. By applying these principles to interactive experiences, you can identify what kind of experience you’re creating for users: Is it adaptable? Does it tell a story? Are there signs of life? You’ll leave with a set of guidelines that, unlike traditional heuristics, will enable you to evaluate the experiential qualities of your designs. Read more – ‘The Dimensions of a Good Experience’.
Hansen’s User Engineering Principles for Interactive Systems
The ‘feel’ of an interactive system can be compared to the impressions generated by a piece of music. Both can only be experienced over a period of time. With either, the user must abstract the structure of the system from a sequence of details. Each may have a quality of ‘naturalness’ because successive actions follow a logically self-consistent pattern. A good composer can write a new pattern which will seem, after a few listenings, to be so natural the observer wonders why it was never done before. Read more – ‘Hansen’s User Engineering Principles for Interactive Systems’.
Shneirderman’s 8 Golden Rules of Interface Design
To improve the usability of an application it is important to have a well designed interface. Shneiderman's "Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design" are a guide to good interaction design. Read more – ‘Shneirderman’s 8 Golden Rules of Interface Design’.
Jakob Nielsen's Ten Usability Heuristics
These are ten general principles for user interface design suggested by Jakob Nielsen. They are called "heuristics" because they are more in the nature of rules of thumb than specific usability guidelines. Read more – ‘Jakob Nielsen's Ten Usability Heuristics’.